Tag Archives: Culinary Historians of Washington DC

Ten Restaurants that Changed America

Americans love to eat French, from Delmonico’s Gilded Age excesses to Chez Panisse’s refined perfection. But don’t overlook Howard Johnson’s ice cream and fried clams, Mama Leone’s exuberant pasta, and Antoine’s classic Creole. So while French may be a default setting, Americans … Continue reading

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Dining with Rebels, Leaders, Heroes, and Outlaws

CHoW is celebrating its 20th year with a new website and an exciting list of speakers. Join us at a meeting, or subscribe to CHoWline, to keep up with our explorations of culinary history. Curious about what dictators eat? Concerned about … Continue reading

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CHoWline–Cake, A Slice of History

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, but Alysa Levene proves a cake is never just a cake. In each slice she finds issues of economics, technology, cultural symbolism, and gender roles–really gives you something to chew on! If you’re … Continue reading

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Food in the Gilded Age

The Culinary Historians of Washington, D.C. are pleased to begin their 20th anniversary season this September 11, 2016. If you’re in town, please do join us. We always think of Gilded Age dining as ridiculously long menus full of game, … Continue reading

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The Jemima Code

In The Jemima Code, Toni Tipton-Martin uncovers an overlooked aspect of culinary history–the under appreciated and often uncredited contributions and skills of African American cooks. In her review of 300 books, dating from 1827, she looks at the books individually–from … Continue reading

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CHoWline–The Carrot Purple

We tend to think that bananas are big yellow things that peel easily and are eaten raw and sweet. Or that celery is thick green stalks with a mild flavor. Or, for that matter, that carrots are orange. But travel … Continue reading

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Eating Mudcrabs in Khandahar

There is a recipe for food writing. Take an unfamiliar food, place, or situation; add mild misunderstandings and good sportsmanship; stir until good will results. The essays in this book don’t use that recipe, as this review in CHoWline notes, … Continue reading

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