Category Archives: Culinary Historians of Washington DC

Southern Food and Civil Rights, Feeding the Revolution

An army travels on its stomach, and a revolution needs to be sustained–with commitment and with food. In this book Opie recounts the tale of the Atlanta, Georgia caterer who fed the bus boycotters and their families, but he also … Continue reading

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Springtime Food Traditions at the Sandy Spring Museum

  A fun time last night at the Sandy Spring Museum, talking about springtime food traditions. A close look  at the seasonal cycles, the foods we eat, and the holidays we celebrate, reveals ancient fears of famine and death. From Demeter and … Continue reading

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Rio de Janeiro, A Food Biography

I love the idea of looking at a city through its food–revealing of people, geography, economy, and culture. And this books goes beyond what you think you know about Rio’s food culture, linking it to the city’s extraordinary setting and … Continue reading

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Eight Flavors

In a clever combination of history and contemporary technology, Sarah Lohman has sussed out what really American flavors are. And you can blame it on the rosewater used to flavor cookies at the Ohio living history museum she worked at … Continue reading

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Cleaning Out the Basement–What Shall I Cook Today?

Spry was a vegetable shortening, says Wikipedia, first manufactured in 1936, and meant to compete with Crisco. Kind of like Hydrox was to the king of all cookies–the Oreo. Today, when we value natural, organic, artisanal, and local, cooking with … Continue reading

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Ten Restaurants that Changed America

Americans love to eat French, from Delmonico’s Gilded Age excesses to Chez Panisse’s refined perfection. But don’t overlook Howard Johnson’s ice cream and fried clams, Mama Leone’s exuberant pasta, and Antoine’s classic Creole. So while French may be a default setting, Americans … Continue reading

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A Square Meal, A Culinary History of the Great Depression

Andrew Coe and Jane Ziegelman go beyond the platitudes about Depression-era dining to discover some uncomfortably close-to-home history. Looking forward to this Sunday’s CHoW meeting (December 11), where Libby O’Connell will be speaking on dining during America’s Gilded Age–its wasn’t … Continue reading

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