Category Archives: Culinary Historians of Washington DC

CHoWline: Soul Food

Have an American meal on this Independence Day–chips and salsa, pizza, hamburger–it’s a big table with room for everyone.

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CHoWline: Food in the Gilded Age

In the 1980s there was a Texas congressman who was skeptical that there were hungry people in the US–poor people looked too fat to be hungry. He was an idiot. Just because there is “food” doesn’t mean it’s healthy, a … Continue reading

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CHoWline: The Foxfire Book of Appalachian Cookery

Have you had that odd jolt yet when you realize you are part of history? Talking to someone in their 20s about the Allman Brothers? That making a shopping list is suddenly considered a life hack? Watching jeans styles go … Continue reading

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Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C.

Examining how we use words, in this case “food desert,” makes us see people and places in new ways–more complex and complete. In this book, Ashante Reese examines a single DC neighborhood and finds agency in food that might otherwise … Continue reading

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CHoWline–Savage Feast

Immigrant stories are fascinating, especially when they are inspired and illustrated by the kitchen and the table. They touch on familiar feelings–the sense of disconnection, feelings of being different, striving for reconciliation. In Savage Feast, Boris Fishman, hits those tropes … Continue reading

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CHoWline: The Rise of Tea Culture in China

This review appeared in the December 2018/January 2019 issue of CHowline, the monthly newsletter of the Culinary Historians of Washington, DC. The book is a deep and detailed look at how tea became a marker of refinement and connoisseurship in … Continue reading

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CHoWline–Dessert, A Tale of Happy Endings

Dessert has a long history, even though it wasn’t always dessert. It began as an in-between course, meant to delight the eye and spark the palate. In some forms, it was even considered medicinal–an aid to digestion and a way … Continue reading

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CHoWline–New Art of Cookery by Juan Altamiras

This review appeared in the October 2018 issue of CHoWline, the newsletter of the Culinary Historians of Washington, DC. Juan Altamiras was the pen name of the Spanish friar who published his recipes in 1745. But never mind that date, … Continue reading

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T-Bone Whacks and Caviar Snacks

This book records the cooking and shopping experiences of two American educators in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, and is an excellent mix of research, experience, and recipes. And yes, some of the tales of privation–wonky stoves, uneven markets–are true, but … Continue reading

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Prison Food in America

This review appeared in the May 2018 issue of CHoWline, the monthly newsletter of the Culinary Historians of Washington, DC. It made me realized that an often overlooked aspect of freedom is being able to choose what we eat, options … Continue reading

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